The Bipolar Bum

Backpacking and Bipolar II. Taking Manic Depression on tour.

About The Author

[Updated 09/05/14]

 

Greetings and well met, traveller of the online wasteland that is the blogosphere.

 

I am a twenty seven year old British man, working in Australia. The soundbite-sized version of my story is that whilst traveling Australia I have been diagnosed as having Bipolar II. My main reason for being in Australia is a manic impulse.  I left my job and swore-off the nine to five existence.  I decided to try and find a job anywhere in the world as a motorcycle tour guide. Coming here was the best decision I have ever made, even if I did make it whilst my judgement was impaired. My diagnosis has undoubtedly saved my life.

 

My primary reason for writing this blog is to explore my illness and treatment.  Further to that however I would like to make contact with any other mentally ill bloggers to share and receive knowledge on treatments, medications and strategies for dealing with the darker aspects of our illnesses.  I harbor a strong desire to help undiagnosed, mentally ill people come to their diagnosis in a relatively painless and forward-looking manner.  If I can do for one person what my friend here has done for me – I will feel tremendous satisfaction.

 

If anything I write here is of any use, or if you believe you may be Bipolar and want to speak to someone in confidence and with anonymity – Please don’t hesitate to contact me.  Likewise if you would like me to guest-write on your blog or website, please do not hesitate to contact me.

 

Yours in health(ish)

Dr.Heckle and Mr.Jibe

335 comments on “About The Author

  1. Juanita R. Els
    22/06/2014

    Hey Dr. H AND uh…Mr. J!

    THANKS FOR THE FOLLOW. All I can say is, WOW. Thanks for being so open and sharing your experience with us via your blog. One thing that attracts me to people is openness and honesty, i.e., keeping things REAL. I absolutely LOVE it, because not only does being real facilitate our own freedom, but it enables us to empower others too. Sadly, there are too many hiding behind their own problems, and here you are, taking your challenges and turning them into solutions. I really appreciate what you are doing. Thanks for being an encouragement!

    Juanita R. Els

    Liked by 2 people

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      22/06/2014

      Hey Juanita,

      Thanks very much for taking the time to come and comment, I really appreciate it.

      I don’t really have much of a choice – I HAVE TO understand and learn better to live with this disease or I’ll end up totally insane, dead or both. If doing the work on here serves others then that to me is and always will be the best kind of bonus!

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

  2. benzeknees
    22/06/2014

    Thanks for following Benzeknees! While I have suffered from Anxiety & Panic Disorder, Depression & PTSD for many years I do not share your diagnosis. I applaud you for reaching out to other people with your difficulties to help & share.

    Liked by 1 person

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      22/06/2014

      Thanks for commenting here, I truly appreciate it! 🙂

      We might not be in the same boat but we’re paddling down the same stream (Or something o.O).

      I love how candid your posts are and the detail you go into. I sincerely believe the best any of us can do is keep a no-bullshit conversation about these diseases going. Other than good parenting for ill kids, this is the main way we’re going to dissolve stigma around these illnesses – by making them as normal as they are frequent.

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

  3. quirkybooks
    22/06/2014

    I teach Blogging as an aid to recovery for the Recovery Learning Community. I used to suffer with depression, but freed myself from it a couple of years ago. Now I help others with mental illness. I love this About page and what you stand for. You are awesome. Keep shining. I have shared this on my http://www.facebook.com/quirkybooksnet page.

    Liked by 2 people

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      22/06/2014

      Thank you so very much for the kind words and good for you beating the black dog! Being totally free of my illness is by now a complete pipe dream, but it’s GREAT to hear of someone being able to rid themselves completely of one of these ailments. Really inspiring and encouraging.

      Thanks also for the share! 🙂

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

      • quirkybooks
        22/06/2014

        You are welcome. I never took medication for my depression, it was all about empowering myself to make myself better. My self-development, taking courses for building my confidence, NLP, positive affirmations, ignoring negativity, learning to love myself and do what makes me feel great all helped to cure me. Also being quirky, embracing my authentic self. I have been thinking about writing a book about it in the future but a fair amount of this stuff is in my new Break through the barriers of redundancy book , out soon on Amazon.

        Like

        • drheckleandmrjibe
          22/06/2014

          Well, good for you again 🙂

          For myself, I was guaranteed a breakdown or an early grave sans medication. I had spent months learning about NLP, neuroplasticity and physiological psychology and it still didn’t stop the inevitable crash. Whilst reading one particular Tony Robbins book it piggybacked on my hypomania and almost tipped me over the edge.

          I think that a lot of the ‘Think positive’ literature is really, REALLY dangerous for anyone with undiagnosed Bipolar Disorder. It turbo charges the mood swings if you get your timing exactly wrong, I was lucky that I didn’t graduate to Hypermania.

          I think writing a book about your experiences cannot be anything but good, for you and your readers. I wish that in the books I’d read though that the author had put a link to a Bipolarity questionnaire before I made myself almost totally insane, haha. Perhaps food for thought?

          All the best,
          H&J

          Like

          • quirkybooks
            23/06/2014

            Hi H&J

            Thank you for sharing this with me. I am not very knowledgeable in the area of Bipolar and I thank you for enlightening me. It sounds like you had a horrid time with the ‘Think positive’ literature. I have only learnt of a little NLP and that was to do with positive affirmations, which thankfully worked incredibly well for me and saved me from a reoccuring problem.

            I don’t know anything about neuroplasticity and physiological psychology and the hypomania and hypermania, I can only guess in broad terms means highs and lows?

            There is a girl at work who has bipolar and I know she gets mood swings and takes medication for it but other than that, I have no experience of Bipolar.

            As I am unaware of how Bipolar affects people, if you don’t mind me asking, what is it about the positive literature that makes the moods swings so severe? Is the battle of two minds, the positive and negative, exploding?

            It would help if I could understand it more, as some of my students have it.

            All the best
            Sandra

            Like

            • drheckleandmrjibe
              23/06/2014

              This is a terrible oversimplification but:

              Hypomania is characterised by elevated mood usually and is a feature of Bipolar II.

              HypERmania is a truly psychotic manic episode often involving auditory and visual hallucinations or severe delusions.

              If the first is left untreated it can progress to Bipolar I.

              The positivity literature for me coincided with a hypomanic episode. Imagine if you’d started doing your affirmations when you were already high as a kite all day every day, sleeping 3 hours a night if at all and you have boundless energy. Your brain is firing faster than you can keep up some of the time, the rest of the time you’re 100 times as productive as you used to be.

              Because I had no idea about my illness I thought that I’d found a way to ‘hack’ my mind and trick myself into becoming superman. This was so damaging for me because it meant the depression crash afterwards felt like the world was ending.

              Selling the positive thinking stuff to someone who is mentally ill and doesn’t know it really is offering them snake oil. It makes them feel even more invalidated when they crash. It makes you feel helpless if it doesn’t work (and for most people it can’t, because their brain chemistry is all to cock).

              The big problem with ‘Think positive’ is that for a lot of us it is impossible for it to work. When you look around and see other people supposedly benefiting from it you feel worse that it hasn’t worked for you. For a lot of us pre-diagnosis we felt like we couldn’t cope with life, that we were deficient in character. ‘Think positive’ cannot be reconciled with that, it simply becomes reinforced denial.

              For Bipolar, the best way to understand it would be to read a book called An Unquiet Mind by K R Jamison. It’s entertaining and very short, you’ll get through it in an evening or two.

              Hope this answered a question or two 🙂

              All the best,
              H&J

              Like

              • quirkybooks
                28/06/2014

                Hello H&J, thank you for taking the time to explain this to me. I apologise if my oversimplication upset you in any way. All of the people who I teach are already aware they have a mental illness, because the course I teach is specifically for people with mental health conditions. So are all of the courses the RLC teaches. I am a peer trainer because I have lived the experience of depression and anxiety too. I am encouraging and supportive in my classes. I do use the positive stuff for my blogs, websites and other social media. I help people who are redundant to get back into work and post inspirational stuff.

                Hypermania sounds horrific.

                I am not bipolar and I understand it must be difficult for you. I know I am not the same as you and you have a good understanding of your own illness.

                I have to say I was interested to read about hypomania and I am sorry for the depression crash it caused you afterwards. I can relate to the hyper part, but from a different viewpoint.

                I am only talking about myself in this next bit, we are all different and if I cause you any distress or ill feeling then please let me know and I shall happily stop typing comments because that is not my intention.

                I am quirky, I have a lot of energy and I love it. I don’t sleep much because I have insomnia and Fibro. Often, if I go to sleep too early, before 1am, I don’t tend to get deep sleep, I can feel I am sleeping. I am more conscious of it. I become alive and awake at night. I have an over-active brain, it is always thinking and my mind can think of several things at once. I love my life and I enjoy being the way that I am. I embrace it. I live on my own and I have found ways to keep myself on a natural happy high. This wasn’t always the case.

                When I was depressed years ago, I used to feel like an alien, a freak, like I was having an outer body experience and that I wasn’t in real life, just existing. In fact it is painful remembering that because I have never shared that much with anyone, apart from my parents and certainly not in public on a blog. It is a past I would rather forget as I am not that person anymore. Ironically, now I embrace my hyper self, I am now me. I wasn’t before I was a stranger to myself, with no purpose in life, not really wanting to be alive and I hated myself and my life. Now I don’t and I live in a quirky hyper state that is the true me and I have never felt better. I no longer listen to people telling me to calm down, slow down, don’t be like this or that. My Grandma was diagnosed with an overactive brain by a doctor at the age of 3 or 4 and I have the same brain as her (she passed away recently on Friday 13th of June).

                I am naturally a hyper person and love being that way. I have to keep myself topped up with positive thoughts, affirmations, feelings, things to do that make me feel great. I often think I am super human in my head, in a similar way to what you have described and in some ways I am. I now realise I was wired this way for a purpose to fulfil the job I was born to do and to lead the life I was born to lead. I am employed and self-employed and need to stay awake to get everything done.

                I know you have bipolar and I don’t, and I don’t get hallucinations. I get bad dreams if I go to bed early, but that’s not the same thing.

                I read this part of your comment with interest: For a lot of us pre-diagnosis we felt like we couldn’t cope with life, that we were deficient in character. ‘Think positive’ cannot be reconciled with that, it simply becomes reinforced denial – Because I used to feel deficient in character. Before I did the positive stuff I had a very low self-esteem. I am still fathoming it out as to why it helped me but it would reinforce the denial to some others. Thank you for making me think about this and sorry for any anguish about this.

                I felt deficient in character as described above, but by changing my mind around, I was able to change myself and my life. Yet become the real me and be happy. I suppose I am coming from a different angle with the positive stuff, I think its’ because I started to believe in me and started to love myself that it worked for me and still does. I had to start believing in myself and to do that I had to rewire my thinking.

                I have the ability to see things that some others can’t because of my unusual brain. I used to see it as a curse when I was depressed and now I see it as the greatest blessing.

                By reaching out to others the way you are doing is very brave, to be admired and encouraged. I expect you will have a lot of others who can relate to you and who you can help. Thanks for trying to teach me about bipolar and for letting me into your world, I know it must be hard for you. Just to reiterate, I sometimes do promote positive thinking stuff on my blogs and sites, as previously mentioned. Especially on my beatredundancyblues blogs and sites. A lot of people seem to like it. I understand if you want to avoid reading them and wish you all the best.

                I think you are doing incredible things with your blog and I hope I haven’t caused you any offense by anything I have written. Keep up the great work, thank you.

                Like

                • drheckleandmrjibe
                  28/06/2014

                  QB – You’ve not offended me at all, anywhere, anytime. Quite frankly you’d have to work very hard to offend me, given the amount of contrition in your replies and your obviously high level of empathy.

                  I’m not saying that ‘think positive’ treatment, affirmations e.t.c DON’T/CAN’T work. Indeed, thinking about positive things and being glad is a shortcut to happiness. The issue for me is that they cannot CURE or alleviate symptoms of Bipolar Disorder alone, in my experience and in the experience of those I’ve spoken to and read about.

                  When you watch a speech by someone like Tony Robbins he openly states things like “I can cure depression on stage” and if he does – great. The problem with it for me is that in order to create the ‘certainty’ that their therapy relies on they cannot entertain any suggestion that it wouldn’t work for everyone. They have to sell the stuff as a panacea or it is no good.

                  If you were listening and engaged and trusting – at this point you become certain that it can work for you too. Then if it doesn’t work or works but doesn’t work forever -you’re back to feeling as though you’re mentally defective, lazy or stupid. A lot of the positive thinking brigade would say that “you’re doing it wrong” or “you’re not committing fully enough to it”.

                  The idea that someone can ‘cure’ depression which we know is a chemical imbalance in the brain, with one session of NLP, CBT or anything else centred around neuroplasticity leaves me dubious when I consider that the drugs we take that work require 3-6 weeks before they start to have an effect. Even then the effect isn’t that of a total cure of symptoms.

                  The worst aspect to ‘think positive’ for me is it’s rigidity. It seems that it can only work for the people it works for if it is given to them as a SOLID, NO QUESTIONS, GUARANTEED RESULT process. So what if it doesn’t work? Think positive has no answers to that, leaving a lot of us worse than before we started.

                  Once diagnosed and properly medicated, learning about how to think in ways that aren’t damaging is a priority. But the most important part of that process for me has been flexibility. I’m trying to make my mind supple rather than stiff and ‘Think positive’ generally doesn’t work within that methodology.

                  Hope this made some sense 🙂

                  All the best,
                  H&J

                  Like

                  • quirkybooks
                    01/07/2014

                    Hi H & J,

                    I really understand what you are talking about, and agree with a lot of what you are saying. I saw Tony Robbins on stage in London from 10-4pm and he was amazing, I had a good experience with him and it did change my life, along with a lot of other things I have done. However, he was not trying to cure depression there and then and I have since had other people tell me that they are not happy with some of the things he says. To cure my depression, I had to change myself, my mindset, my life and learn to love myself. It was not an overnight thing at all. I am thankfully a different person now, I am my authentic self, the true me and who I was born to be, before all of the rubbish got in the way. My time to live is now and even though it was my Grandma’s funeral yesterday and she was a best friend to me, my life is still in general, the best it has ever been. Although, I am well aware that I have to maintain a positive state in order to not slip back into a depressive state. It’s a bit like constantly giving my mind a mental workout.

                    I do completely see where you are coming from. I guess the ‘Think positive’ answer to what if it doesn’t work, is that if we were thinking positively, we wouldn’t consider that it didn’t work, as that is not positive. If you can’t contemplate it not working, because that would be negative, then you have to think positive and the idea becomes self-fulfilling. I don’t know if that helps?

                    I think you have to be flexible in your thinking and go with what works for you. We can’t agree with what every ‘positive speaker/thinker’ is talking about. Personally, even recently, I had to go my own way and try to be happy with my own thoughts and my own decision to not agree with everything one motivational/positive speaker was talking about, otherwise I was feeling bad about myself, like I had let myself down in some way and that is not a positive feeling.

                    I think it’s great you talk so openly and I thank you for giving me such insight into your life. Much appreciated.

                    Like

                    • drheckleandmrjibe
                      08/07/2014

                      “Although, I am well aware that I have to maintain a positive state in order to not slip back into a depressive state. It’s a bit like constantly giving my mind a mental workout.”

                      This is one of my biggest problems with a lot of the positive affirmation therapy. If you don’t have the mental bandwidth to commit to the affirmations or if your depression cripples you, or god forbid the world gives you one too many kicks – it can be impossible to gear up the happiness circuitry in a way that is lasting. Sometimes the energy that the mental workout requires is just absent for a lot of people and that is where the therapy seems unable to provide an answer. The answer always comes across as “Try harder” without accepting that the nature of depression is that you are largely incapable of that kind of herculean effort.

                      “I do completely see where you are coming from. I guess the ‘Think positive’ answer to what if it doesn’t work, is that if we were thinking positively, we wouldn’t consider that it didn’t work, as that is not positive. If you can’t contemplate it not working, because that would be negative, then you have to think positive and the idea becomes self-fulfilling. I don’t know if that helps?”

                      Flexibility in thinking for me means accepting the potential of failure as we don’t have close to a 100% understanding of brain chemistry, mood circuitry or treatment of mood disorders. If ‘Think positive’ becomes an affirmation that’s used to block out the real chance of something not working then it amounts to a kind of wilful ignorance that not everyone is capable of. Cynicism, realism and being scientifically minded all leave a person ill-disposed to accepting things on blind faith and without questioning a treatment’s efficacy.

                      This becomes the crux of the discussion we’re having – If you effectively ban yourself from thoughts that are realistic purely because they’re not ‘positive’ then it requires an enormous, and often untenable, effort to brainwash yourself out of realistic thinking in favour of positive thinking. This is where the positivity literature, talks and theory failed for me personally.

                      I won’t deny anyone their happiness however they find it, but this final ‘de militarised zone’ between your experience and mine is where we cannot be reconciled because our paths, post-positive-thinking- are completely divergent. For you it has meant that your quality of life has improved, and by conscious maintenance of your mood with the affirmations and techniques you’ve learned – you can stave off bad feeling.

                      For me the techniques simply couldn’t effect a lasting change, and a lot of the time I didn’t have the energy to give to maintenance. My underlying chemical imbalance meant that I couldn’t possibly determine my own mood for most of the time. This wasn’t due to an absence of belief or effort on my part. The reason I have the opinion I do of positivity-literature is precisely BECAUSE I believed wholeheartedly that I could control my moods absolutely for the rest of my life – and then the opposite proved to be the case.

                      Sorry for the late reply, Internet has been down!

                      All the best,
                      H&J

                      Like

                    • quirkybooks
                      11/07/2014

                      Hi H&J, bless you. Thank you so much for your detailed explanation. I completely get where you are coming from. It is very hard for me to maintain a happy mood all of the time. By choice, I have to monitor my mood all of the time. If you couldn’t determine your mood then it can see how it would be hard or impossible to control it.

                      I have to constantly live in my quirky bubble to feel okay or mostly good. I have to keep creating excitement, magic and wonder in my life, repeatedly and it is difficult sometimes. I love being in my home, or near to it, living the life that I love to lead. My quirky way. If I come out of that environment, I can start to feel bad and need to get back into my bubble as quickly as possible. I enjoy living on my own with my guineapigs because I am hardly ever blue. I can’t imagine living with anyone ever again, unless they make me feel as good as I make myself feel or better. For someone else to make me feel good whilst living with me, may be virtually impossible, as I am not sure anyone else could live like I love to. But that’s the point, in order to make myself happy I have to lead my quirky eccentric life, regardless of what anyone else thinks. I didn’t do this up until about 2 and a half years ago and that lead to me becoming free of depression. I refuse to lead a ‘normal’ life because it’s not good for my mental health. I didn’t realise before that this is what I needed to do.

                      I think you have pretty much covered everything in your comment as to why we have a different take on the matter. I think we both have valid point because we both have different experiences. The only thing I would like to add from my own view point, is that I don’t see failures anymore, only mistakes, that hopefully I learn from. I think I did the best I could do at that time, with that knowledge, feeling or experience. It’s time to reassess the situation and move on.

                      Like

          • angrygreycatreads
            08/07/2014

            You are very correct in saying that reading a lot of the self-help/self improvement books is dangerous for bipolar individuals (particularly individuals who have not been diagnosed and are not under a doctor’s care or medicated). i was marred to a rapid cycling bipolar man for 17 years – he would easily get wound up by the self-help individuals (he wasn’t so much into reading, he would attend “seminars”) It would drive his mania through the roof. There was recently an article about the negative effects of positive affirmations. He had delusions of grandeur at his high ends and his low swings had delusions of paranoia. Unfortunately, he never achieved success with a treatment program

            Personally I suffer from mild depression and anxiety, which I controlled with a variety of talk therapy, yoga and exercise.

            Liked by 1 person

            • drheckleandmrjibe
              08/07/2014

              My experience with self-help and affirmations e.t.c was that of having my hypomania turbocharged. It was dizzying, intoxicating and addictive.

              I’m sorry to hear about your ex-husband’s lack of success with treatment, but I find consolation in the fact that you’ve got a system that works for you.

              Thanks very much for contributing here.

              All the best,
              H&J

              Like

  4. stump3d
    22/06/2014

    Hi H&J,

    I, too, am diagnosed with Bipolar Type II disorder and I share your sentiments in trying to erase the stigma regarding our condition. It can be managed with proper maintenance medication, stress management and engagement in therapeutic activities. I know that there are still a lot of unknowns regarding our disorder and being open about it and sharing our stories with our fellow “sufferers” is a good way to learning more about it and being able to manage it. I, too, am determined to live my life unburdened by this disorder. I am currently teaching IT here in the Philippines but I plan to jump ship and kick start my career in game development anytime soon. Props to you and hope you are well. 😀

    Warm regards,
    Reggie Santos

    Liked by 1 person

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      22/06/2014

      Hey man,

      Thanks for taking the time to come and comment here and to share your story. Game design – I envy you. Is there a particular developer you’re going to aim to work for?

      Whilst manic a while ago I decided that I was going to master C# in anticipation of the Rift being released, as with most manic impulses I did really well until the mania ended and then it felt pointless, like everything else.

      I agree with you – sharing makes this easier and broadens the scope of the discussion surrounding the illnesses. The more people are talking about them, the better.

      Right now – I’m very well 🙂

      Speak soon, Reggie!

      H&J

      Like

      • stump3d
        22/06/2014

        If I’m privileged enough to be able to work with Blizzard, Square Enix and Electronic Arts, that would be great. But I’m still starting out at this and my skills are barely up to scratch.

        And it’s cool what you started out with Rift. It’s kinda the thing nowadays – augmented reality. It’s starting to dominate the playing field.

        I also know what you mean with losing interest after our “bursts of passion”. A very big high then a very big low. Hope you reconsider trying it out again. 🙂

        Like

        • drheckleandmrjibe
          22/06/2014

          I may do, but I’m woefully behind the curve and my competitors will be leaps and bounds ahead of me. I would need to make my entire life about coding and I’m not convinced that my personality would mesh well with that lifestyle.

          You’ve got high ambitions, and that’s great!

          H&J

          Like

          • stump3d
            22/06/2014

            Well, yeah, that’s true about the highly-intensive requirements of game development, H&J.
            Good luck to wherever our endeavors take us! 😀

            Liked by 1 person

  5. ravenreid
    22/06/2014

    Hey there 🙂 I think you followed me recently or liked something, so I ended up clicking through to your blog and I’m very glad that I did.

    I’m dating a wonderfully eccentric bipolar man, and have been seeking info on the illness in order to become a better partner. It’s been smooth sailing thus far, but he did warn me pretty early on that I was essentially signing onto the roller coaster that is his life. From what I’ve read, it seems bipolar dating can be tricky business. Anyway, I’m a psyc minor in university and an avid supporter of open dialogue around mental illness, so I very much appreciate the time and effort you’ve put into this site and look forward to reading more of your experiences!

    Thanks again!

    Like

  6. belshade
    22/06/2014

    Thanks for following my blog – hoping it gives you pleasure. Good luck in your research into your and related problems. Des.

    Like

  7. The Savvy Senorita
    22/06/2014

    Hi and thanks for the follow, I appreciate it. Sounds as though you have had an interesting change of scene, hope it is all going well for you? Please feel free to drop by my blog and say ‘hello’ any-time! All the best, Bex

    Liked by 1 person

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      22/06/2014

      Hey,

      This is the best move I’ve ever made, I believe. I couldn’t have landed in a better situation without winning the lottery.

      Thanks for taking the time to come and comment here, Bex. I extend the same invitation to you! 🙂

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

      • The Savvy Senorita
        23/06/2014

        Seems so 🙂

        Thanks, of course and I hope you’ll take some time to visit my blog too. That would be welcomed!

        All the best, Bex

        Like

  8. jackfboyle
    22/06/2014

    Hey, thanks for the follow! Your attitude towards your mental health seems very healthy. I moved to Germany from Britain, not so much on a manic impulse, but to follow my girlfriend and the experience of moving away, and like in the Twain piece you recently wrote, I definitely feel more content in myself for having done it.
    Hope all is well.

    Liked by 1 person

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      22/06/2014

      Hey Jack,

      Thanks for taking the time to comment here, I really appreciate it.

      I drove to Germany in 2007 to attend Wacken Open Air and I have to say, I don’t have a single bad thing to say about the Germany I saw, tasted and met.

      Everything is well, thanks for the well-wishes. I hope you and your girlfriend are lapping up the teutonic treasures on the continent!

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

  9. Anna Waldherr
    23/06/2014

    Thank you for the follow! You are very courageous both to have started a new life, and to be sharing the details of your illness. I’m sure others will benefit from the knowledge they are not struggling alone. My only caution would be to run all medical advice by your doctors. All the best, A.

    Like

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      23/06/2014

      Hey Anna,

      Thanks very much for taking the time to comment and for the kind words.

      I can only advise from my own personal experience. Over the past few days I’ve seen multiple suicide posts by bloggers on here and no one has told them that they’re thinking incorrectly, no one has argued. Whether this is genuine callousness (I doubt it) or that people are afraid of saying something that will either make it worse or get them in some kind of trouble should the suicide be successful – I can’t say for sure. I am lucky in that, because I’m not a doctor, I do not fall foul of the Hippocratic oath – first do no harm.

      In my experience ‘First do no harm’ often becomes, as I’ve seen with the suicide blogs, ‘First do NOTHING

      As far as medication – I defer completely to the doctors. They know more about the meds than I do. I can tell people what worked for me, but that’s about it.

      For the rest, I.E advice on thinking and feeling, surviving being suicidal, clawing your way out of the pit of despair and co-existing with brain diseases – We on WP probably have more combined knowledge than the doctors will have for the next few hundred years. I don’t think it is arrogant to say that, it is simple fact. I’d rather hear from someone who has been there and come back, than a doctor who has read about it. We lead from the front.

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

  10. charlypriest
    23/06/2014

    Appreciate you stopping by my blog, I have a close family member that suffers from a mental illness but it´s schizophrenia which is quite something when you first see him go through a psychotic episode. Now we are use to it and know how to best behave and treat him. It was learning experience for the family as a whole. So I´m glad you´re bringing up the taboo words of mental illness, and let people know about it more. I do follow some and viceversa 2 or 3 bloggers that suffer mental illness and actually through months now of corresponding with them we have become “friends”, virtual friends since each is living in one place of the planet from the other, and is a big planet :). I will talk to them, and let them know about your blog. Again I appreciate you stopping by my crazy un paid blog.

    Liked by 1 person

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      23/06/2014

      Hey man,

      Thanks a lot for taking the time to comment here, I really appreciate it 🙂 As for the recommendation – Great!

      The challenge of coping with Schizophrenia, whether personally or as a family member/loved one, is just beyond my imagining. I’m not smart, imaginative or empathetic enough to understand the difficulty involved. I’m really glad that you guys have managed to make it work. So often there are stories shared on here of families being unsympathetic or simply not well equipped enough to deal with these illnesses. It’s great to hear a matter-of-fact success story like yours.

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

  11. therealhermione
    23/06/2014

    I have to say, this is really amazing and helpful. And thanks for stopping by my blog, which incidentally I started writing as a means to cope with self-diagnosed depression (it could be just plain homesickness too). I’m not officially diagnosed as having either depression or Bipolar, but I do suspect that I have both, at the very least, I’m borderline bipolar, by my own opinion.
    Icing on the cake- I am a student of neuroscience and hope to crack the mysteries of the brain someday. Only that my first attempts towards achieving that dream just looks like it has got washed down the drain (I messed up at the lab, and my reputation is at an all time low). But this endeavor of yours is definitely a great help for many people out there.
    Keep posting and I too shall try and do my bit to help people out and also help myself. 🙂

    Like

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      23/06/2014

      Hey there,

      Thanks a lot for taking the time to comment and for the kind content of aforementioned comment 🙂

      As well as ‘homesickness’ you struggle with serious insomnia from what I’ve read. Don’t make the mistake of writing your illness an alibi, if indeed you are ill.

      Have you seen any doctors or ever taken any medication for any of your symptoms? How old are you, if you don’t mind me asking?

      Helping others often seems easier than helping ourselves. Self-awareness and rigorous self analysis are exhausting when you’ve been inadvertently ‘faking normality’ as long as some of us have.

      All the best,
      H&J

      Liked by 1 person

      • therealhermione
        24/06/2014

        Hi H&J,

        Thanks for the kind words.
        I know that its not good to pretend ‘normal’ when one does not feel alright. And yes, I suffer from a serious case of insomnia, but I unfortunately the only ‘professional’ help that I have been able to get have been talking with the student counsellor at my university- which did not help. I haven’t consulted any doctors, nor have I ever took any medication.

        I’m still an undergraduate student, and just turned 22, and am finishing up my work at lab this week, so its finally home and back to my parents in less than ten days, after a ten hour flight. I will be able consult someone once I’m back at home. Only, that my parents doesn’t seem to understand when I tell them that I need to see a doctor for my sanity. They keep insisting that nothing could be possibly wrong and that I don’t need any sort of psychological help from outside. So, the only solution I have found is to go without taking permission for once.

        That is the whole irony of the situation right? I used to lend a helping hand to all my friends from college who had problems and had helped them put their lives in perspective, only when it comes down to me, I am unable to take my own advice and have ended up in this state.

        I’ve been doing a lot of soul searching recently (ever since my project-of-a-lifetime kind of bachelors thesis got messed up), and have decided not to fake being normal. Unfortunately, as I tried to approach my project coordinator regarding my problems and the difficulty I was having with going forward with the experiments and asked for help and guidance, he chose to chide me and ridicule me instead. But, I have decided to make do with whatever I have so far. There is really nothing else I can do without losing my mind completely in a foreign country. Reading about these problems have been helping a lot too.

        Thanks again, and all the best to you too.

        Liked by 1 person

        • drheckleandmrjibe
          24/06/2014

          Hey again,

          Thanks for taking the time to reply in full. Might I suggest that getting to see a doctor ought to be a priority now. It can feel ridiculous and self-indulgent to approach the possibility of something like Bipolar Disorder before your diagnosis – trust me when I say that you are NOT being self-indulgent. The thoughts you cannot help but have are good, solid evidence for a suspicion of an illness.

          Your parents don’t live inside your brain, so consequently they cannot possibly be able to tell you whether you are or aren’t ill. From what you’ve said about your parents – I would stop listening to them about anything medical.

          All parents want to believe their children are perfect little bundles of loveliness, in a lot of ways they have more reasons to indulge with denial than the ill party. The whole notion of ‘perfection’ baffles me anyway.

          Councillors and professors are not equipped to talk to you about this. To identify a mental illness (and god I hate that term) requires a rigorous, no-nonsense discussion with someone who knows about the diseases.

          Try doing the Bipolar test I’ve linked to on the navigation bar of this website. See how you come out. The Black Dog Institute also have a clinical depression test too I think.

          Honestly – you’re at the age where, if caught early enough, you can hope for these illnesses to be reversed completely, rather than needing drugs for your entire life. The earlier you catch something like this the better.

          Worst case – you spend time with a doctor that doesn’t come to much. It’s worth the risk, honestly! I wish I’d gone to see a doctor ten years earlier when I was in college.

          If you have any questions/comments that you’d rather discuss privately – I have a contact form on the nav bar and I would absolutely love to help if I can.

          All the best,
          H&J

          Liked by 1 person

  12. booguloo
    23/06/2014

    You might want to give yourself more time learning; Volunteer maybe. When my brother came back from Viet Nam he volunteered and became a Psychiatric Technician working in the wards. Diagnosis can get tricky, even for the professionals. There is one that can walk like a duck, talks like a duck and acts like a duck, but could be BPD, Borderline Personality Disorder and not Bipolar. And it’s not uncommon for a person suffering with both or as they say having a dual diagnosis. I seen this article and thought you might gain more insight.
    http://pro.psychcentral.com/differentiating-borderline-personality-disorder-from-bipolar-disorder/005080.html I believe you’re going to be a real asset for your cause.

    Like

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      23/06/2014

      Hello and thanks for taking the time to comment, firstly.

      I don’t like to think that I’ll ever stop learning! I’ve thought about Borderline and, whilst that case isn’t closed, I fit BP II absent of BPD best right now. My understanding may evolve.

      For myself – the proof of the pudding is purely in the meds that most help.

      A lot of the time it feels like these words and conditions we bandy about don’t really work. They feel like a square peg for a round hole a lot of the time and I GENUINELY believe that in a hundred years or less our medical professionals will be talking about today’s Psychology in the same way we talk about mysticism and alchemy.

      Thanks very much for sharing the article. I’m putting together a ‘useful documents’ page for this website right now and that one made the shortlist.

      When it comes to comparison between BPD and BP my mind baulks. Something about these descriptions for what I know of my own moods, feelings and thought habits just doesn’t mesh properly. I take this as my (and possibly the wider) understanding of these illnesses is still in it’s very infancy.

      Thanks again for commenting in such an encouraging and helpful way. I truly hope that I do become and asset for the cause.

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

  13. Uncle Spike
    23/06/2014

    Hey there Newbie Spikey!
    (for your info, a Spikey is the term for folk who are part of the clan known to be followers of Uncle Spike 🙂

    Thank you… I really appreciate that as I for one, know how many interesting and entertaining blogs are out there.

    Blogging since June 2013, my aim is to deliver an eclectic offering of posts, from my ‘point n shoot’ attempts at basic photography, to the sharing of my travel adventures over the decades, as well as day to day happenings here on the farm. Oh, plus a few observations, opinions and lighter-hearted stuff thrown in for good measure.

    I normally keep to a couple of posts a day, maybe 3-4 at weekends if I have something special to share. But if you are at a loose end one day, maybe you’ll enjoy trawling through some of my older stuff too. I have added plenty of categories to help in said digging process.

    Thanks again and hope you have a great day…

    UNCLE SPIKE

    Like

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      23/06/2014

      Hey Uncle Spike,

      Thanks for coming and taking the time to comment here, I hugely appreciate it 🙂

      Have a poke around, see if anything tickles your fancy.

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

      • Uncle Spike
        23/06/2014

        I certainly will do – bookmarked for some evening browsing 🙂

        Like

  14. morethanwords
    23/06/2014

    HI Iam so happy you are following my blog and shared your story here.

    Meditation, counseling and lot of exercising has helped me. Meditation puts your mind at ease. Restlessness and negative ideas are out of you body and mind.

    Counseling helps immensely….music and writing heal you ..when I have been low music and exercising has helped me.

    Medicines have made my body lethargic and I have put on weight. But, exercising puts your body back to shape and kills the lethargy.

    Cheers!!!

    Like

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      23/06/2014

      Heya,

      Thanks very much for taking the time to come comment here! 🙂 I really appreciate it.

      Counselling is free where I live right now because I’m lucky enough to have a wise, aware and kind house-mate. I cannot overstate how much care the people I live with have given me. They’ve very literally saved my life.

      Exercising will be high on the list soon. I’m moving to an area with EXTREMELY limited inter. It is remote. My girlfriend and I will be exercising together a lot.

      The meds do come with a price, I agree. Seroquel has made me a bit sluggish and I find thinking to be more difficult than it used to be, but also a lot less dangerous than it used to be. I’m happy with the trade-off for now.

      Thanks again for the kind words 🙂

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

  15. joannaohayes
    23/06/2014

    Hi Dr H, thanks for the follow 🙂 I don’t always post re: mental health on my current blog, but if you’d like to dredge through an archive of terrible poetry (gosh, what an offer!) my other/semi-defunct blog heartbeatpoecy.blogspot.com.au has more relevant writing… But super happy to know of you now and will try to keep up as I can 🙂 😊 Jo

    Liked by 1 person

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      24/06/2014

      Heya Jo,

      Thanks for the link and for coming and taking the time to comment here 🙂

      I’m much more interested in the things that are happening now than back then. I’m not reading blogs purely for research but to connect with people, whether they’re ill, used to be ill or have friends/family who are ill.

      All the best,
      H&J 🙂

      Like

  16. victoriadougherty
    23/06/2014

    Lovely, honest introduction. Thanks. And thanks for following me on Cold.

    Liked by 1 person

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      24/06/2014

      Thanks for taking the time to come and comment here 🙂 I was intrigued by your Born Cold page, and sold when I read the last interview you did.

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

  17. istralouise
    24/06/2014

    Hi H&J!
    Thank you for following my blog! I don’t suffer bipolar but I have a friend that was diagnosed that quite a long time ago. I have schizoaffective disorder, depressive type, which is like having schizophrenia and severe clinical depression. I’ve been diagnosed and in therapy for 9+ years now through a mental health agency in the states that handles prescribing medication and individual and group therapy. (Minus the roughly two months where I just had a lapse in coverage to receive mental health services).

    I appreciate what you said about the ‘think positive’ movement. It is helpful for me to study things like that.. but only after medication and therapy emphasizing cognitive behavioral psychology. I am the rare bird that has some insight into whether the voices were real or not, so I was misdiagnosed at first as merely having depression. (As my first psychiatrist mistakenly said, “Real psychotic people don’t know its not real”) Eventually I became so bad that Iost that sense of what was real or not and only regained it with medication. Back when my problems were milder I would swallow up self-help books but still have no control over how I felt or the agitation or my distractability and inability to take care of myself. I went to a group “Life Skills” class that didn’t help me at all until years later, AFTER intensive hospitalization and medication. For someone severely mentally ill, self-help is like trying to put a kid’s band-aid over something that needs cleaning and stitches.

    I will have to come back to read more of your blog later, but it is very interesting and I like how frank you are.

    Liked by 1 person

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      24/06/2014

      Hey there Louise

      Thanks very, VERY much for taking the time to share your story here and for the kind words.

      I think your band-aid analogy is very apt. Well put.

      It’s frustrating that there are so many snake oil salesmen pumping out the “Positivity” line with absolutely no credentials that show them to be worth listening to.

      About a month ago I attended a T.E.D talk rip-off. One of the guys came and gave us all the affirmations and ‘believe you can do it, and you can do it’ stuff. His brag was that he had a 3million dollar mortgage by the time he was 30. What he never mentioned but was absolutely clear to anyone with any intelligence was that he had also declared bankruptcy since then. Checking the guy’s website showed he was part of a team of people who thought they were a lot smarter than they are, selling “motivational training” and “entrepreneurial/innovation workshops”.

      It could only be better for them if they were paid by the word and got a bonus for using words they didn’t understand.

      I’d be glad if you did come and read more, you could lend some unique insight to some of the discussions we have here 🙂

      All the best,
      H&J

      Liked by 1 person

      • istralouise
        24/06/2014

        I’ve only recently heard of ted talks and was kind of interested in seeing what they were like. How disappointing. In another place I had a call out for resources, so I gave out the names of my very favorite books on MI that I was familiar with only to be asked afterward something like “Oh, books.. do you have anything in the way of YouTube videos or Ted Talks?” It was a bit crushing, especially since I don’t think that YouTube is the best place to get that sort of information, though I could be wrong. I’ve only heard of Ted Talks in the past year.

        Like

        • drheckleandmrjibe
          24/06/2014

          Oh please – Don’t get me wrong. T.E.D talks are rarely anything other than EXCELLENT!

          The evening I attended was trying to be a T.E.D talk but it failed miserably.

          I highly recommend going and looking at Andrew Solomon’s TED talks among others. I would leave Ruby Wax’s well alone, it came across as flustered and amateurish to me, which seems unusual from what I’ve heard about her shows.

          TED = Thumbs up, seriously.

          All the best,
          H&J

          Like

          • istralouise
            25/06/2014

            Cool, I will go do that! And its reassuring that not all new trends are full of crap.. I’ll go ahead and check them out!

            Like

          • istralouise
            25/06/2014

            I just watched my first TED talk.. The author you mentioned and his lecture, “Depression, the secret we share” Thank you so much. I’ve never heard someone so eloquently describe the weight that ordinary everyday actions seem to attain when I’m there.

            Like

            • drheckleandmrjibe
              25/06/2014

              He’s a wordsmith, to be sure. TED is a mountain of useful information and well put together speeches. I love it.

              Have a look at this one:

              It contrasts sharply with Solomon, but it’s good.

              All the best,
              H&J

              Like

              • istralouise
                28/06/2014

                I think I intrinsically pull back at the idea of being considered “special” because of my illness. I think its because I put so much energy into realizing that my voices, delusions, hallucinations lie and don’t represent reality. And that when I was lost in them it was like being lost in a horror movie 24/7 with no relief. Still, it is very good. I kind of find it fortunate that my experience with psychosis was so horrendous, other people that experienced positive aspects (like phantom cats that kept them company) find it much harder to accept treatment that might help them because they may lose some of the positives as well.

                I watched the one with Ruby Watts that you warned me against.. I was entertained until I was ready for the informational part of the speech to start……. and then it ended abruptly.. and she did come off amateur.. I think especially contrasted with Andrew Solomon or Eleanor Longden (who I disagreed with) it was obvious that she didn’t have her speech down pat and she came off as scatterbrained a bit. Still they are really good.

                Liked by 1 person

                • drheckleandmrjibe
                  28/06/2014

                  You’ve touched on a point that resonates with me but in a different way. I’m glad I never ‘graduated’ to total psychosis because I feel as though I’ve caught my illness before it has become too bad. I read the stories of people who’ve been less fortunate and feel grateful. Hypomania is something I miss and I suspect I always will, but missing hypomania is better than dealing with crushing depression.

                  I admire your perspective on your psychosis; it demonstrates powerful thinking.

                  I get the impression that Ruby Wax was ill on the day of the T.E.D talk. I’ve seen other videos of her where she comes across as genuine, charming and very together. She seemed flustered and a little bit out of control in the T.E.D talk tome. As you say.

                  All the best,
                  H&J

                  Like

  18. Karina Susanto
    25/06/2014

    Hello there,
    Thank you so much for following my blog. this was an honor for me.Will looking forward to read your great blog posts. Blessings.

    Like

  19. Jane de Bat
    26/06/2014

    Hi! Thanks for following me 🙂 I enjoyed reading about you. There seems to be a common thread linking the mentally ill together. I would never presume to understand being bipolar, but I can relate to the pain it has caused you.
    It has taken me years to overcome a deep depression combined with a general anxiety disorder and disthymia (a low-grade, chronic depression). I recently asked my doctor if I could start decreasing the dosage of my meds. She doesn’t want to jeopardize the progress I’ve made, so we will wait. I have resigned my self to the fact that I will be on meds the rest of my life. I would have died without medication and came close while taking them.
    Mental illness is messy and a lot of people don’t want to hear all the gory details, but they need to hear. Ironically, the lack of understanding from the people closest to me, created despondency spiralling into suicidal thoughts.
    We have to keep talking and thanks to people like you we will!
    I’m sending best wishes your way 🙂
    PS. I got carried away writing, sorry about that!

    Like

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      26/06/2014

      Please don’t ever apologise for writing a thought-out comment on here. I hope that you write many more! Thanks for the kind words and for sharing your story.

      My family have been relatively supportive. At first, of course, there was ‘nothing wrong with me’ and then I was foolish for taking medication. Over time they’ve come to terms with the idea. It’s tough for them because I’m on the opposite side of the world. I’ve undergone a true transformation and they’re not here to see the shades and nuances of the change.

      If your meds aren’t broken – I wouldn’t fix them!

      Keep talking here with us, please 🙂

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

      • Jane de Bat
        26/06/2014

        My doctor said the same thing, “If its not broken, why fix it.” 🙂

        Like

  20. championriver
    26/06/2014

    I only read one of your posts so far and I admire your authenticity. Thank you for being open and honest, as it encourages me to do the same on my blog. Thank you for following me and I look forward to what you have to write next!

    Yours truly,
    C.R.

    Like

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      26/06/2014

      Hey there, thanks for taking the time to comment and for the kind words.

      I read all of your posts and you come across as authentic. It isn’t easy to admit to your flaws publicly but it gives you the jolt you need to move on and improve yourself. Good for you.

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

  21. Karina Susanto
    26/06/2014

    Hello H&J
    Thank you very much for following my blog. It was such an honor for me 🙂 Nice to meet you here in WordPress. Many blessings to you.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Aul
    26/06/2014

    Thanks for the follow!
    Aul

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Gator Woman
    26/06/2014

    Your courage is so admirable.
    You may never know how many others will benefit from this stand you have taken.
    God Bless~

    Like

  24. annanimm
    28/06/2014

    I was diagnosed as Bipolar II. A long time ago. And I came to reject it. Not in the sense that I thought the diagnosis was off, and there was a better one to be found, but that the whole perspective of the mental illness industry is off. There are many different traditions, from Buddhism to shamanism, which look upon the symptoms that the medical establishment might classify as depression or mental illness as a spiritual crisis, in which someone begins to question all their values and the assumptions they inherited from a so-called “normal” society, and as a important prelude or as a necessary crash on the way to transforming their life. And as something that especially sensitive people, who are meant to be healers, often go through. Perhaps you’d find this article interesting, http://earthweareone.com/what-a-shaman-sees-in-a-mental-hospital/

    Like

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      28/06/2014

      Hi there,

      Thanks for taking the time to comment and to share the article you did.

      I fall almost completely on the side of Hippocrates when it comes to mental illness, in that I believe there are physical (genetic and neurological) causes. I believe that a lot of what we currently understand about brain diseases is probably going to be proven to be pseudoscientific in the fullness of time, but that somewhere among the things we know there is the birth of a full understanding of the human mind. In the same way that we see alchemy as being the birth of chemistry I believe that modern psychology and psychiatry will eventually be pruned and a true understanding will blossom from the proven truths that remain.

      On that basis, I take as much information as I can from science – with all available evidence and proof and temper it with my own personal experience in an effort to understand as much as possible how to make myself well. If something works for me, I won’t be told that it doesn’t. I fall on the side of Andrew Solomon in the placebo argument in that nothing can be called a placebo when it improves and creates a lasting change in your mood.

      It’s because of this that I’m torn when I read about unscientific views on brain illnesses. Archaic superstition especially.

      On one hand – if a treatment leaves someone happier and more functional afterwards, then I wouldn’t jeopardise that person’s quality of life just for the sake of backing up scientific methods which have a tumultuous history and uncertain future. The ultimate goal on my part is that I and others can achieve a greater quality of life through understanding and overcoming these illnesses.

      On the other hand – I’ve had personal stories given to my via this blog, and read of countless other occasions of (Particularly African) third world understandings of brain illnesses as spirit possession or a punishment from god that leave the afflicted hopeless, shunned and TOTALLY neglected when a local remedy such as the Senegalese Ndeup fails to cure what is essentially a chemical imbalance or neurological malfunction. Many Africans are told that the Western ‘belief’ that these things are errors in the workings of our brains is nonsense in favour of a mystical explanation. These Africans are then left, when treatment regularly fails completely hopeless.

      Because of the fact that the above example of certainty in a belief can have a positive effect is true to me – I ABSOLUTELY believe that the inverse is also true. If a Schizophrenic truly BELIEVES that they’re possessed by demons – their condition, I believe, would worsen. If a depressed person is told that a certain ceremony will DEFINITELY lift their misery and then it doesn’t, and if the person then believes that they are DOOMED to forever be miserably – they have yet more reasons (and powerful reasons) to be depressed.

      I sincerely believe that even discounting history – purely in modern day societies that there are likely to be more cases of neglect than of a miraculous cure by faith-healers.

      If any of these treatments work, I find it more likely that the utter-certainty of belief on the part of the afflicted is a cause of some kind of remission of symptoms than any kind of entity from a spirit world. We have absolutely no evidence that such energies and entities exist and the propagation of these beliefs stands as a barrier to scientific methods that are shown to work from being applied to desperately ill people.

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

  25. Nadia
    28/06/2014

    Thank you for passing through my blog. I love what you’re doing here!

    Like

  26. Jazz Cookie
    28/06/2014

    Thank you for following Skylark Writing Studio. I’m not a psychologist or in any way qualified to offer writing as a healing process, but I know it can be that and often is. Your honesty in telling your story is touching many hearts and minds – always a good thing when coupled with the compassion in your messages.
    All best,

    Like

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      29/06/2014

      Thank you very much for taking the time to comment and for the comment being as pleasing to read as it is. I’m trying my best to write in a way conducive to my own healing and development while prompting a decent amount of discussion here.

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

  27. simonfalk28
    28/06/2014

    Thanks for the follow and hope you enjoy our beautiful country.

    Like

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      29/06/2014

      Loving it so far. I think I was fortunate to start in one of the best corners of it!

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

  28. dragonflygypsyusa
    28/06/2014

    Hi there!! I have nominated you for the Very Inspiring Blogger Award. Here is a link to the details. Enjoy!!

    http://dragonflygypsyusa.wordpress.com/2014/06/28/im-inspiring/

    Like

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      29/06/2014

      Hi there.

      Thank you very, very much for the nomination. I decided a short while ago that I was going to forego awards and chain posts as I’m afraid I quite simply don’t have the time to commit to them. I HUGELY appreciate the sentiment though.

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

      • dragonflygypsyusa
        29/06/2014

        No worries and you are very welcome! I love your blog and since there is now a link to it on my blog, even more people will get to enjoy it too!

        Like

  29. TanGental
    29/06/2014

    Well, what can I say, H&J? Thanks for the follow seems totally inadequate given I’ve just read a little of your blog and the above comments, explanations and guidance. I want to say ‘fascinating’ but that feels a little ‘liking’ a FB post about something terrible. I’m not a great one for admiring honesty in an absolute sense – those people who can only speak the truth are a pain and a danger and knowing how and when to lie so as not to gratuitously hurt someone is the mark of a civilised society. But this – the depth of the analysis and open minded approach – is splendid and a gripping read. I often wonder how people find my little blog, let alone follow it, but I’m glad you did because I’ve learnt a bundle in a short time. Given you’re a biker, it seems, and not one given to a belief in some almighty hand guiding you, then may I wish that your carburettor never floods and you plugs never grow oily…

    Liked by 1 person

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      29/06/2014

      You would have had me at “Thanks for the follow” or “Fascinating” 🙂 Thanks very much for the kind write up and I’m glad that you’ve enjoyed what you’ve read so far. I’m not one of those people who is incapable of lying, part of my issues with myself results directly from my ability to lie.

      Thanks very much for the well wishes. May your tyres stay forever warm and your chain permanently taught.

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

  30. writingsprint
    29/06/2014

    Hello, Heckle/Jibe! Thank you for following my blog. Good luck and safe travels on your journeys. I

    PS, I’m a Men at Work and Colin Hay fan too 🙂 .

    Liked by 1 person

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      29/06/2014

      I’m not sure anyone is ever going to believe it but I came up with the name in the absence of any knowledge of the songs! Haha. That’ll teach me for not googling ahead of time.

      Thanks for taking the time to comment and for the well wishes mate. Best of luck to you too!

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

  31. tubularsock
    29/06/2014

    drheckleandmrjibe, Tubularsock thanks you for the follow and has returned in kind. What a great idea you have hit upon. Will be interesting to follow your sojourn from Tubularsock’s safe underground bunker.

    Liked by 1 person

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      29/06/2014

      Thanks a lot man. I really like your schtick, it’s refreshing and zany.

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

  32. Wordsgood
    29/06/2014

    Hi there!

    First, thank you so much for Following my blog. I feel honoured to have you on my team, so to speak! 😊

    I am not bi-polar. though I was once incorrectly diagnosed as being such, and treated for it. As much as those kinds of meds are life savers for people who actually are bi-polar, they were almost lethal for me. But that’s a long story I won’t bore you with.

    I do have a lifelong history of of deep depression, as well as anxiety issues, so I can definitely relate to your situation on certain levels.

    I don’t know if you looked at my profile or not, so I’ll summarize it here for you. I’m a mid-fofties, long-time married woman with two grown foster-daughters. I am on permanent disbility and have Multiple Sclerosis (MS). We have one ancient kitty who turned 20 a couple months ago, another elderly feline gent of 14.5 years, and a black lab who just turned 13 a few weeks ago.

    I like your About page and think your stated blog goals are both courageous and noble! I will be following you as well, and look forward to getting to know you better! 😊 😸 🐶 🐈 ☺

    Cheers!

    Liked by 1 person

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      29/06/2014

      Hey Wordsgood.

      Thanks for taking the time to come and comment, and for the kind words! You’re one of the unusual ones – it’s usually people with Bipolar being diagnosed with Unipolar depression!

      Your oldest cat is almost as old as my girlfriend! Haha

      I’m glad that you’re getting stuck-in on here and hope to hear more from you. I hope you inject the same passion into the discussions here that you bring to bare on your own posts.

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

      • Wordsgood
        30/06/2014

        You’re most welcome. I’m looking forward to getting to know you as well. I’m no Shakespear, but I’ll certainly try. 😉

        Re: my cat…😂 😄

        Liked by 1 person

  33. sozsatire
    29/06/2014

    Thanks for the follow my friend, much appreciated. I’m not actually suffering from a mental illness at present but my wife and kids are doing everything in their power to bring about a change in this sorry state of affairs. I’ll keep you posted.

    Like

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      29/06/2014

      Cheers for the follow and for taking the time to comment, and for pulling the punch of searing satire as far as the brain diseases go. It’s a sensitive subject for loads of people, I tend to take things fairly well but I can’t make guarantees on everyone who’ll read this. 🙂

      All the best,
      H&J

      Liked by 1 person

      • sozsatire
        29/06/2014

        I’ve a feeling you’re the sort of bloke I’d enjoy having a pint with. Not Fosters though mate! There are limits you know! 😉

        Liked by 1 person

        • drheckleandmrjibe
          08/07/2014

          I don’t drink anymore so mine would be something as non-alcoholic as Fosters, perhaps. You’re right though, Australian beer is SHITE. 🙂

          If you’re ever up around FNQ, sling me a message on here or e-mail.

          All the best,
          H&J

          Like

          • sozsatire
            08/07/2014

            I used to quite like that Tooth’s KB lager back in the day but only because it had pictures of ladies in various states of undress on the tinnies…or was that Fosters? I’m too drunk to remember in all honesty 😉

            All the best my friend and thank you for taking the time and trouble to reply. It’s more than my wife ever does 😀

            Like

  34. sundryfolly
    30/06/2014

    Thank you for the follow! I know that it takes courage to start over in a new place. I wish you the best of luck on your journey. Stay strong! 🙂

    Like

  35. Turquoise Compass
    01/07/2014

    It is never too late to dream a new dream! Welcome to Turquoise Compass!
    Jessica, Turquoise Compass

    Like

  36. Y. Zheng
    02/07/2014

    Thanks for following my blog. I find your blog very interesting and I’m looking forward to reading more. 🙂

    Like

  37. amandaquirky
    02/07/2014

    Not to be weird(er than I already am) but has QuirkyBooks disappeared? I was following the most INSANE conversation between you 2–and I don’t mean that lightly, I mean she was giving out completely bonkers, suicide-assisting (unintentional, presumably), guaranteed-to-push-you-off-the-crazy-cliff advice–and I wanted to respond with, um, sensitivity and decorum, and certainly not by shouting at her that her advice is going to land someone in a hospital, e.g. the families of people who come off meds because, “I KNEW I was alright!” and then, wham, bam, manic-but-angry land, and there’s my dad kneeing my stepmom in the spine so hard she can’t stand up straight for 2 days, but he’s FINE, y’know, he just gets EXUBERANT sometimes, he doesn’t need to take a dirty pill, if he BELIEVES he’s okay, he IS okay (and fuck those of us with bruises because we questioned how healthy and sane he is, I guess).

    So I just wanted to share those helpful hints, but I can’t find the convo anywhere.

    ?

    –AmandaQuirky 🙂

    Like

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      08/07/2014

      Hey Amanda,

      Perhaps you’ve both been granted a reprieve from the raging torrent of a discussion that would come from it ? :p The comments are still there. I’ve been away for a while because of the internet abandoning me here, but I replied to QB’s last comment this afternoon.

      I’m all for people disagreeing and talking about it – with incendiary issues like that one though I have to urge caution that it doesn’t turn into a slanging match. I’ve never had to step in on any discussion on here which is great, and I don’t doubt your decorum when posting – if things get too much or you’re completely irreconcilable in your views try to not explode! 🙂

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

  38. Thanks for signing up to follow my blog. I’m not sure how
    much help I would be with my posts.
    My nuturing yourself post seems to be encouraging for many.
    I hope you’ll pop over and give them a read.
    Good luck with your blog and your journey to self-discovery.
    Namaste

    Like

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      08/07/2014

      Hey there Isadora! 🙂

      I’ve been without the internet since I signed up so I’ve been unable to get over and read any more, but I will do once I’ve caught up with replying to people here!

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

  39. readbetweenthelyme
    03/07/2014

    Thanks for the follow. My own goal for the blog I started very similar to you’re. It’s a way for me to try and work through this illness at a personal level while also, I hope, allowing others some insight into Lyme disease. Thank you for opening your heart and sharing with us!

    Like

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      08/07/2014

      You’re very welcome and thanks in return for sharing your story. I appreciate the support and hope you get as much out of your blog as I’m being given here by my readers.

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

  40. theoccasionalman
    04/07/2014

    I got a Men At Work CD today and heard the song your name comes from. I approve.

    Like

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      08/07/2014

      I’m not sure how credible you’d find this – but I thought of the name without ever having heard the song, haha. It’s only come to light after the fact. Here’s what you get for not googling a potential handle!

      H&J

      Like

  41. Hi I’ve nominated you for a very inspiring blogger award – your work deserves it!
    If you will accept it, these are the rules…
    1) The nominee shall display the Very Inspiring Blogger Award logo on her/his blog, and link to the blog they got nominated from.
    2) The nominee shall nominate fifteen (15) bloggers she/he admires, by linking to their blogs and informing them about it.
    If you’re too busy to do all that I don’t blame you, and I hope you will just take it as a compliment to your efforts . See here: Life’s Journeys Unfolding http://meaningunfolding.wordpress.com/?p=976&preview=true

    Like

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      08/07/2014

      Hey there 🙂

      Thank you very much for the nomination. I hugely appreciate it.

      I’ve decided to not take part in the awards and chain posts anymore simply because of a lack of time but thank you nonetheless!

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

  42. Herman
    11/07/2014

    Hi there! Thank you for visiting and following HoB. Much appreciated!

    Like

  43. Patti Walsh
    14/07/2014

    I’ve nominated you for Very Inspiring Blogger Award. Click here for details! http://popforunpop.wordpress.com/2014/07/13/i-dont-usually-think-of-myself-of-inspirational-but-gee-thanks/ And thank you for what you do!!! -Patti

    Like

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      17/07/2014

      Thanks very much for the nomination Patti. I’m not doing the chain posts anymore because I can’t commit the time or bandwidth to it, unfortunately. I hugely appreciate the thought though, thanks a lot!

      H&J

      Like

  44. catsntea
    19/07/2014

    Hello! Thanks for the follow, you were my first one 🙂 Great blog, I love your honesty. All the best x

    Like

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