The Bipolar Bum

Backpacking and Bipolar II. Taking Manic Depression on tour.

MentalHealthTalk.info – Reclaiming Reality; A story about Bipolar

A short while ago I was asked to guest blog for http://www.Mentalhealthtalk.info.  The founder Trish asked that I write my story.  I don’t know if I qualify as a narcissist because of this but to do that in 1500 words or less was incredibly difficult.  I’ve realised though that to write to a word limit takes more patience and craft than just splurging out whatever I feel like.  It is something that I’m going to challenge myself to do on here occasionally.

 

The piece has just been published and can be seen HERE.

 

Get over there and give your old pal, H&J, some support.  While you’re there – take advantage of the great articles on offer and have a look at their cartoon book.

 

All the best,
H&J

Advertisements

24 comments on “MentalHealthTalk.info – Reclaiming Reality; A story about Bipolar

  1. Susan Irene Fox
    02/06/2014

    Terrific bio. While it may not seem like it, you’re quite lucky. I didn’t receive a diagnosis until I was 50. Like you, I was initially diagnosed with depression; like you, once I had a correct diagnosis, meds saved my life. I continue to learn more and more from wonderful bloggers like you. You’re a blessing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      02/06/2014

      Thanks a lot for that! I am grateful for a lot of things, being diagnosed this young really is a case of better late than never for me and the more people tell me their stories of waiting until much later for a diagnosis, like you, I just become more appreciative of my circumstances. I’m lucky that I have a close relationship with my immediate family and that I’m relatively foot-loose and fancy-free.

      Thanks again 🙂
      H&J

      Like

      • Susan Irene Fox
        02/06/2014

        🙂 When I did get the diagnosis, so many things fell into place for me – including the probability that my dad had it, too. He was never diagnosed, but looking back on his behavior, I’m certain he had it as well. Explains so much of his extreme mood swings; he was either angry, abusive, irritable on the one end, or depressed on the other – no in-between ever. So sad we never knew.

        Like

        • drheckleandmrjibe
          02/06/2014

          This is the thing that frustrates me SO MUCH. Where I live – there is NO discussion about Bipolar, Schizophrenia, Depression. All any of these things translate to in the regional lexicon is : “Lazy” or “Benefit fraudster”. It is disgraceful.

          The best way forward that I can see is to have emotional literacy classes right from primary school. Rigorous lessons in logic and RIGHT-thinking. Developing into discussions about how the kids think and explanatory lessons about different illnesses.

          Am I being a dreamer? Probably, looking at how politicised these illnesses are in the public sphere. I don’t know how we’re supposed to get healthy people interested in knowing about our illnesses.

          I suppose provoking public discussion about them is the best way for now.

          H&J

          Liked by 2 people

          • Susan Irene Fox
            02/06/2014

            I think so. I know there is still stigma, and frankly, only two close friends know about my diagnosis. One of these days I may get the courage to disclose about it on my own blog. Truthfully, you and a few others are the ones who will eventually give me courage to do that.

            It’s why I appreciate your transparency so very much. I know I’m not walking this road alone. Thank you again from the bottom of my heart.

            Liked by 1 person

            • drheckleandmrjibe
              02/06/2014

              You’re welcome.

              A lot of my friends know about me. I had to disclose to them because once I started thinking about my past in the context of the diagnosis, I owed out a lot of apologies to people who were really close to me.

              I’ve not ‘gone public’ with it though, because quite frankly it isn’t everyone’s business. I’m sure eventually I will, but for now I’m still wrapping my head around the day to day ramifications of the illness.

              Knowing I’m helping, in some small way, you folks is a HUGE encouragement. So thanks a lot for that.

              All the best,
              H&J

              Liked by 1 person

  2. glenn2point0
    02/06/2014

    Great article mate!
    And being on 800mg of seroquel has also been my life saver and game changer.
    I certainly relate to the psychosis and the paranoia.
    I was only diagnosed with BiPolar last year.
    Prior to that it was OCD, ADD, Dysthymia and Narcissistic Personality Disorder.
    Without the seroquel I endured the daily racing, contradictory and suicidal thoughts and eventually set a date to take my life.
    The wrong medication nearly cost me my life.
    My GP first prescribed seroquel prior to a new psych diagnosing the BiPolar and increasing the dosage to 800mg.
    And it’s not narcissistic to tell your story.
    It can help understand yourself and also help you find your peers.

    Like

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      02/06/2014

      Cheers Glenn,

      The incidence of misdiagnosing Bipolar II is absolutely STAGGERING. This is why I get so irritated to see Bipolar II classified as a less-serious version of Bipolar I. It EVADES CAPTURE even in front of the professionals. Of the two illnesses I don’t think it is too far a stretch to assume that Bipolar II probably kills more people, but we can’t gather the statistics because they were undiagnosed or misdiagnosed at their end.

      H&J

      Like

    • Marie Abanga
      02/06/2014

      I am in awe thay the story seems similar in Africa but for the fact that added to no diagnosid, the situation is more likely, attributed to witchcraft or evil spirit cum punishment from god. You can imagine how having it all so mixed up can lead to all sort of scenarios right?Cheers to you guys 😛

      Like

      • drheckleandmrjibe
        02/06/2014

        Superstition (and it’s little brother religion) cause more harm than any other single thing I can think of, especially in Africa it seems.

        As if these diseases aren’t hard enough to grapple with, without all the fairy stories and mumbo jumbo.

        I don’t know how any of us in the west can help. It’s depressing.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Levi Thetford
    02/06/2014

    I’m very glad the you are being treated properly now. Hopefully, it is life-changing for you.

    Like

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      02/06/2014

      It has been so far, and I’m only a few months in. I feel empowered to really change how my life FEELS to me. This is all a new development after fourteen years of developmental stasis.

      Thanks a lot for the well-wishes!

      All the best,
      H&J

      Liked by 1 person

      • Levi Thetford
        02/06/2014

        I will be praying for you and the doctors treating you. It certainly took a long time didn’t it?

        Like

        • drheckleandmrjibe
          02/06/2014

          When compared to some (even some commenting in this thread) I got off lightly. It took long enough by my standards. I think it is a fair goal to make sure that it takes LESS time for someone else. If I can manage that, my life has been worth-while. I don’t intend to have kids, so my contribution can be however little I can further the discussion around bipolar and illnesses like it.

          All the best
          H&J

          Like

          • Levi Thetford
            02/06/2014

            You’re life can be very valuable, and you are very valuable whether you realize it or not. I’m so glad the tide is changing. I will watch for your progress and education on this subject from you. Thanks for doing it. Blessings!!!😀

            Like

  4. Marie Abanga
    02/06/2014

    Dear H&J,

    You are already helping by making these resources available and the peer support initiative and all. I push not for myself anymore, but for my brother and numerous other back in Africa who have suffered and ended it all without any recourse. I am an unconventional girl and proud to be. I excaped that society for my own sanity, leaving my own 3kids behind. Now, l am thriving and cut off from tradion and religion like the flea. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. It’s a pleasure to have you as a guest on MHT and thanks for the shout out!

    Love,
    Trish

    Liked by 1 person

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      03/06/2014

      It’s a pleasure to be on there with you all 🙂 Writing to a word limit is something I haven’t done since I was in highschool (almost a decade ago). I relished the challenge, despite the frustrations that came with it. It has helped me a lot with the writing so thanks for the opportunity!

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

  6. What a FANTASTIC guest post, H&J! I’m so sorry it took so long to get a diagnosis but so glad that you finally got one (like you, I found actually getting a diagnosis, to be vitally important), and that this has led to you being on medication that is making such a difference to your life. This bit particularly hit home, as it is still true of me, only in my case, I need to replace ‘medication’ with ‘therapy’: “My most damaging psychosis is the idea that I am not ill; just being self-indulgent. I STILL, and perhaps always will, have to actively resist this idea lest I abandon my medication.”
    As for writing to a word limit….from my personal perspective, it’s definitely worth the challenge, in terms of rewards. I am definitely NOT saying posts should be of a particular length, or that long posts can’t be great posts – they can! I am making the comment purely from the perspective of the writer, rather than the reader – as a reader, I enjoy all kinds of posts. But as a (trying-to-be-a-half-decent) writer, I completely agree with your comment about ‘crafting’ a post, and I have found the ‘crafting’ aspect to be a very satisfying and enriching part of blogging. I have a problem being concise (did you notice?!) and although I don’t set myself word limits in my posts, they do take me a while because I try and cut out anything I don’t think is strictly necessary, or doesn’t add something, to that post.It’s made me wonder whether I might have enjoyed life as an editor!
    But on the other hand, splurging also has its great benefits, so keep on doing that too 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      03/06/2014

      Thanks a lot for the kind words 🙂 I really appreciate the encouragement, especially when someone takes the time to write a really fleshed out comment like this one. I’m glad you’re in a position where you can grapple with your illness effectively. If you’re anything like me, before the diagnosis it was like trying to fight an invisible foe that you weren’t fully convinced was there anyway.

      I’m going to set myself word limits from now on in the feature articles on here just for the practise, but in the about me section and the other static pages I’ll just leave it open ended with regards to the wordcount. See how that goes 🙂

      Thanks again for taking the time to comment.

      All the best,
      H&J

      Liked by 1 person

  7. It was exactly like that for me – feeling like I was fighting a nameless enemy. I felt powerless against it. How could I fight what I did not know? And thank you for taking the time to reply to everyone’s comments, including mine 🙂 x

    Like

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      03/06/2014

      The comments are why I’m doing this 🙂 It’s no trouble at all.

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

  8. psychconfessions
    09/06/2014

    I got very emotional reading your story because I could relate to so much of it; the misdiagnosis of depression, feeling like you are just not ‘strong’ enough for life and the racing thoughts and alcohol abuse. I can also relate to the bad reaction (suicidal) to SSRIs and to the mood switching and agitation. I could feel tears in my eyes reading your story as I think I may have finally worked out what’s been wrong with me for the last 10 years; Bipolar II. I haven’t yet received a diagnosis (as I guess you know after reading my blog post earlier) but I’m starting to feel hopeful that I may finally be on the path to getting the right treatment and understanding myself. Thank you.

    Like

    • drheckleandmrjibe
      09/06/2014

      This was absolutely FANTASTIC to read, thanks very much for taking the time to post it. I won’t lie – the BEST outcome for me from this blog is helping someone get to a diagnosis and get on the right track for helping themselves. I want to do for others what my friend here did for me. If I’ve managed that with you then you’ve got no idea how happy it will make me!

      Keep in touch – I’d really like to hear how you go with the doctors.

      All the best,
      H&J

      Like

Have your say

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Information

This entry was posted on 02/06/2014 by in My Guest Articles, Stable and tagged , , , , .
Follow The Bipolar Bum on WordPress.com

How we're doing.

  • 25,440 hits

ARCHIVE

%d bloggers like this: